Brussels concert life - part 2

Brussels concert life - part 2

A life without music? Unthinkable, at least for most of us. Thankfully, in Brussels the music never stops.  You can attend a whole range of concerts every day in the most diverse of genres.

Go to agenda.brussels for a detailed concert calendar. After all, you want to know who will be appearing on stage next, don’t you? But before you check it out, have a look at the go-to hotspots we’ve selected for an unforgettable concert evening. Music, maestro!

  • Muziekpublique (c) Fabrice Deramaix

     

    For lovers of (mainly) classical and contemporary music

    Classical music seems to have a love affair with architecture, because the concert halls in this list are all heritage gems that are worth a visit, for their architecture alone.

    The prestigious Henry Le Boeuf Hall at Bozar is the first on our list. This Art Deco gem was designed by Victor Horta. For ninety years this hall has welcomed the crème de la crème of the music world in the best acoustic set-up.


    Henry Le Boeuf - Bozar (c) DR/GR

    Around the corner is the Musical Instruments Museum or MIM, housed in the dazzlingly beautiful Old England building, an Art Nouveau masterpiece.  Here you can admire a wonderful collection of musical instruments and enjoy live concerts on the eighth floor.

    On to Place Eugène Flagey. Here, your eyes are instantly drawn to the 1933  ship-like edifice by Art Deco architect Joseph Diongre. Welcome to the Flagey cultural centre, overlooking the ponds of Ixelles, which once housed the offices of the national broadcaster. Today, the various halls at Flagey host quality music concerts, especially (contemporary) classical and jazz music.


    Flagey
     

    Is opera your thing? Then there’s one place to be, but what a place: the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie. In this static Neoclassical building on Place de la Monnaie you can indulge in world-class ballet, concertos and dance performances, as well as in addition to excellent opera productions.

    But there’s more! Classical music is flourishing in our capital. The Royal Conservatory offers a magnificent concert programme. Atelier Marcel Hastir also organises small-scale concerts that immerse you in a visual art bath.

    You can attend festivals all year round, such as the KlaraFestival, Musiq'3 and the Midsummer Mozartiade, not to mention numerous performances in churches and cathedrals, which are guaranteed to transport organ music lovers to seventh heaven.


    Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie (c) Simon Van Rompay

    For lovers of traditional music from all over the world

    Does flamenco awaken the beast in you? Does your heart skip a beat when you hear ethnic rhythms and sounds that are not often played on the radio? Does fado give you goosebumps? Then Muziekpublique is a must. Or why not enjoy a musical trip around the world from the red velvet seats of the Theatre Molière at Porte de Namur?

    Just opposite the Belgian Comic Strip Center you will find Art Base. This is where you can meet Frans, a passionate art lover who invites small ensembles from all over the world to play music surrounded by art paintings. It doesn't get any more intimate than that: you can almost touch the musicians.

    Espace Senghor is also a must in this list. This is actually the cultural centre of the commune of Etterbeek, named after Senegalese poet Leopold Senghor. This centre very strongly believes in the connecting power of music, and programmes jazz and classical repertoires in addition to traditional music.


    Art Base (c) Michel Brebant

    For jazz cats

    Brussels is known the world over for its bubbly jazz scene. In addition to numerous jazz festivals that often take place outdoors, the genre is popular in the capital's cosy pubs and jazz clubs. To find out where to grab a bite while listening to jazz, click here. You can find even more info about jazz in the city at www.jazz.brussels. And hold on to your seats because 2022 will be an ode to the world-famous Brussels jazz hero Toots Thielemans (1922-2016).

     

    Read also: Brussels concert life - part 1