Coudenberg Palace

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Coudenberg Palace

The huge Coudenberg Palace, which was the pride of our princes and governors, vanished in the 18th century. It was initially destroyed by a fire in 1731, then finally demolished more than 40 years later to make way for the Royal Quarter that we know today. A series of archaeological digs carried out over a 25-year period have uncovered the remains of certain parts of the palace and the area around it. Today, visitors can still explore the cellars in the main body of the medieval castle, which belonged to the Dukes of Brabant (12th-14th centuries), as well as the foundations and the ground floor of the palace chapel (built in the 16th century, in the reign of Charles V), the Rue Isabelle/Isabellastraat, which once linked the palace to the collegiate church of Saint Gudula, and the Hoogstraeten town house, whose remarkable Gothic gallery overlooked the garden. Lastly, they can also see the lower levels of the building, mainly the kitchens and the Aula Magna, a grand stateroom constructed between 1452 and 1460 for Duke Philip the Good. This prestigious space once hosted the major events of the Court in Brussels, such as Mary of Hungary’s accession to power in 1530, the abdication of Charles V in 1555, royal balls and weddings, like that of Alexandre Farnèse and Maria of Portugal in 1565. It is now open to the public for tours. (Listed 04/07/1984 and 31/01/1992)

Practical information

  • Rue Villa Hermosa/Villa Hermosastraat 5 (special entry for Heritage Days)
    1000 Brussels
    • Sat. & Sun. from 10h00 to 18h00
    • T
      Royale/Koning
    • B
      Royale/Koning