King Baudouin Park

King Baudouin Park was created starting in 1983 to protect one of the last remaining enclaves of natural Brabant landscapes in the Brussels-Capital Region. This initiative also enabled the creation of a landscape of more than 100 hectares bringing together the magnificent beech trees of Laerbeek, Poelbos and Dieleghem woods, as well as meadows, marshland, ponds and grassy expanses. In the lower section, an English-style landscape park was developed encompassing the garden of the Institut du Sacré-Cœur and the bed of the Molenbeek Valley. Wide lawns bordered by flowerbeds, isolated trees, water features and reed beds, home to frogs, newts, kingfishers, Eurasian reed warblers and numerous fish, surround one of the last remaining vestiges of the Abbey of Dieleghem, namely the watermill fish pond. Higher up, hedgerows of hazel bush, holly, hawthorn, blackthorn and hornbeam encircle the remaining pastureland, orchard, vegetable gardens and fields of crops, recreating, on the edge of Brussels, a unique bucolic atmosphere. A neo-Norman style cottage, built in 1908 for lawyer Eugène Van den Elschen by Liège architect Charles Castermans, is home to a café, a popular stopping point for walkers.

Practical information

  • rue Bonaventure
    1090 Brussels
    • T
      Gare de Jette/Station Jette
    • T
      Guillaume de Greef
    • B
      Eugène Toussaint
    • B
      Gare de Jette/Station Jette