The Institut Bruno Lussato & Marina Fédier

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The Institut Bruno Lussato & Marina Fédier

The most imposing residence designed by the architect Antoine Pompe is to be found in the heart of the leafy Prince d’Orange neighbourhood. The Villa Clairval was constructed between 1924 and 1926. Built for the Brussels-based stockbroker Grunewald, it is characterised by its corner bow windows, its Flemish or Anglo-Norman-inspired sloping roofs, its timber-clad gables, its expressive brickwork and the subtle division of its interior space, punctuated by differences in levels. Although the windows were modified by the architect Léon Govaerts, it has nevertheless retained its original overall sense of unity. 
These days, it is home to the Institut Bruno Lussato & Marina Fédier, which has housed a collection of Japanese Mingei folk art since 2013. The exhibition contains pieces ranging from the 12th to the 19th century. Lussato, the great French humanist, pianist and man of culture, joined forces with his sister to create the institute with the aim of continuing his work and spreading his holistic ideas on culture, philosophy and science. 
A new wing, situated in the building facing the street and equipped with the latest audiovisual technology, has recently been added to the complex. It will be used to host exhibitions, conferences and concerts, as well as calligraphy and Ikebana flower arranging workshops. Various meetings with leading figures from the artistic, intellectual and scientific worlds will also be held there, in addition to artists’ residencies. The park dates from the time when the house was constructed and makes the most of the irregular topography of the site.

Practical information

  • Avenue de la Sapinière/Denneboslaan 52-54
    1180 Brussels
    • Sat. & Sun. from 10h30 to 17h00
      only accessible within the framework of the activities
    • B
      Napoléon
    • B
      Prince d’Orange/Prins van Oranje
    • B
      Prince d’Orange/Prins van Oranje