The Protestant Church of Brussels (formerly the Royal Chapel)

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The Protestant Church of Brussels (formerly the Royal Chapel)

The construction of the “Royal Chapel” was entrusted to the architect Jean Faulte on 1 May 1760. While its design is derived from that of the chapel at the Palace of Versailles, its general appearance is, surprisingly, reminiscent of the chapel of the Château of Lunéville in Lorraine. This enabled Charles of Lorraine, who governed these provinces under the reign of the Empress Maria Theresa, to feel at home. Inside, the aisles are surmounted by galleries exhibiting a superimposition of columns with Ionic and Corinthian capitals, in the great classical tradition of French architecture. However, it is all handled with a degree of artistic licence typical of the Louis XV style, with certain details (the Pompeian capitals with their corner volutes and the motifs that mimic lace) hinting at the future style of Louis XVI. After the Revolution, Napoleon signed a decree assigning the chapel to the Protestant faith in October 1804. The interior was fully restored in 1987, so that it regained its original appearance. The columns and pilasters have retained their stucco lustro decorations. The marble floor is the original. The chapel still contains a beautiful set of stuccowork decorations on the door lintels as well as in the choir, where cherubs surround an image depicting the Virgin. (Listed 20/11/2001).

Practical information

  • Place du Musée/Museumplein 2
    1000 Brussels
    • Sat. & Sun. from 14h00 to 18h00
    • T
      Royale/Koning
    • B
      Royale/Koning