The hamlet of Roodebeek

22
The hamlet of Roodebeek

The hamlet of Roodebeek long retained its rural aspect. Lacking the structure of a parish, it has always been modest in size, consisting of just a handful of farms such as the Hof ter Cauwerschueren, which was established in the 14th century. Like the other farms, it sits beside the Roodebeek river, whose partly preserved bed can still be seen at the far end of the park. At the time, Forest Abbey already owned a large estate in the area. The meadows and farmland then stretched as far as Evere and the Linthout wood. In the 18th century, the monastery of the Jesuits of Brussels also owned land in the hamlet of Roodebeek. In 1778, the owner of the Château Malou acquired a number of parcels of land from the monastery (which would later form the basis for Roodebeek Park) and leased them to a farmer, who used them for quarrying sand and stone, thereby permanently changing the topography of the area. These parcels were divided into two properties (one owned by the collector Émile Devos and the other by the painter Constant Montald), which were subsequently acquired and combined by the municipality and opened as a public park in 1948. The hamlet of Roodebeek only began to urbanise towards 1900, when workers from the Tomberg brickworks started settling in the locality. In 1914, the area was already served by the tramway, with a school being added in 1925 and a church in 1938. While the Roodebeek river disappeared in 1950 with the construction of a main sewer, the pockets of greenery that survived serve as contemporary reminders of the ancient hamlet’s rural past.

Practical information

  • 1200 Brussels
    • M
      Tomberg
    • B
      Sainte-Famille/Heilige-Familie
    • B
      Verheyleweghen
    • B
      Andromède/Andromeda